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How to Keep Glasses from Getting Foggy

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Whether you live in a cold climate or have visited one in the winter, you have probably seen someone who just walked in from the cold outdoors sporting glasses that are no longer transparent, or perhaps you’ve experienced it yourself.

Why Do Glasses Fog Up?

There are several factors that cause your glasses to fog up — one of which is ambient heat, in other words, the actual temperature in your surrounding environment. Eyelashes that touch the lens can cause fogging, as well as tight-fitting frames that touch the cheeks (many plastic frames cause this problem), which impede proper airflow. Lastly, high humidity and the sweat and moisture that accompany overexertion/ exercise can also trigger foggy lenses. 

Ultimately, glasses cloud over due to moisture in the air condensing on the cold surface of your lenses. 

Now that you know the most common reasons why your glasses fog up, it’s time to read about some possible solutions. Below are a few tips to help keep your lenses clear year-round.

6 Tips to Steer Clear of Cloudy Specs 

1. Invest in Anti-Fog Coating

Anti-fog coating blocks out moisture that would normally stick to your lenses, by creating a surface layer that repels water and mist. An optician applies the treatment to both sides of the lens in order to prevent fogging so you can see clearly in any climate or environment.

Ask us about our proven anti-fog treatment for your glasses and be on your way to clearer vision, all the time.

2. Use Anti-Fog Wipes, Sprays, or Creams

Commercial anti-fog products are an alternative to lens coatings. These products, typically sold in either gel or spray form, are specially designed to prevent condensation and moisture from building up on your lenses. Apply the product as directed on the packaging and remove it with the supplied cloth, wipe or towelette. If a cloth wasn’t included in the box, use a scratch-free cloth.

Aside from the gel or spray, you can use anti-fog wipes. These pre-treated napkins are perfect for those who are on the go. 

3. Move Your Glasses Further Away from Your Face

Eyeglasses tend to trap moisture and heat, particularly if they are positioned close to your eyes or face, which increases the buildup of fog on your lenses. Consider adjusting the position of your eyewear by pushing your glasses slightly further down your nose. It will stimulate proper air circulation, thereby reducing fog accumulation.

4. Wear Your Seasonal Accessories Wisely

If the weather cools down, try not to wear too many layers, to prevent overheating and producing sweat, which can make your glasses to fog up more. Wear only the necessary amount of clothing to stay warm. If you’re wearing a scarf, consider one with an open weave or a more breathable material to let the air pass through. 

5. Avoid Abrupt Temperature Changes

Allow your eyewear to acclimate to changes in temperature. If you are moving from an environment that is cold into one which is warm and humid, try to let your glasses adjust accordingly. 

For instance: 

  • As you enter a building, stand in the doorway for a minute or two as the temperature slowly transitions from cool to warm. 
  • When in the car, gradually adjust the heat, particularly when your hands aren’t free to simply remove your glasses and wipe off the fog.

Fogged up glasses are not only irritating but can also be dangerous, especially for those who drive, ski, or operate machinery. So make sure to take the necessary precautions, especially as the weather changes. 

6. Swap Glasses for Contact Lenses

If contacts are an option for you, you might want to wear them on those cold days, to avoid foggy glasses syndrome (yeah, that’s a made-up term).

 

Want to keep your glasses from fogging up? Speak with R. L. Rodriguez. At Dr. Rodolfo L. Rodriguez, O.D., P.A. in North Bergen, we can advise you about a variety of contact lenses, anti-fog treatment and other solutions to help you see clearly— any day. 

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As the COVID-19 crisis develops, I am on-call to treat urgent, need to be seen in person patients only. Eye doctors have gotten the green light to attend to patient’s urgent needs via telemedicine, phone or video chat (face-time type of technology) that permits to talk to the patient and/or to virtually see you and take care of your eye issues, answer questions and to prescribe or refill medications from your home, as we practice shelter-in-place. Insurance have accepted telemedicine charges while we are in this state of emergency. As primary eye care provider we are focused on the health of our patients, our practice remains at the frontline providing essential eyecare. urgent and emergency eyecare to our patients in an effort to alleviate burdens on emergency departments. We are actively monitoring and updating these procedures as the pandemic evolves and new recommendations are issued.

We continue to maintain hygiene and infection control protocols as usual.

NOTICE:

If you returned from outside the US or visited an area defined by the CDC as an area of high risk IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR

If you had direct contact with an individual with confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR,

If you had direct contact with a person who is currently being quarantined for coronavirus (COVID-19) exposure IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR,

If you felt feverish, have difficulty breathing and had a cough in the last 24 hours, please note that you will not be given an in-person appointment.

We are prioritizing in-person examinations only to those that are suspected to be medically urgent or time sensitive and established patients who require in-person ongoing care to prevent vision loss or those who indicate that that they are having injuries or urgent eye care needs. We are rescheduling patients that have non-urgent conditions. Please call my cell phone only for true emergencies: 201-370-1142.

Steps you can take to prevent spread of flu and the common cold will also help prevent COVID-19 (coronavirus):

•Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If not available, use hand sanitizer.

•Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.

•Avoid contact with people who are sick.

•Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or sleeve when coughing or sneezing.

•Avoid close contact, distance yourself and others, especially important for those who are at higher risk of getting sick to avoid contacting others.

•Strongly recommended that people remain in their homes. Must stay home if you are sick, except to get essential medical care.

•Keep hydrated. You don’t need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks are in short supply and should be save for caregivers. If you are sick, you should wear a facemask when around other people. COVID-19 is particularly serious for the elderly and those immune suppress but can be serious for anyone.

Wishing everyone good health!